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New York Times story shoots down popular myth that sprinkler requirements negatively impact housing development

By Fred Durso, Jr. If there’s one myth fire sprinkler advocates hear ad nauseum, it’s the one about fire sprinkler ordinances driving up housing costs and forcing homeowners to seek cheaper alternatives in neighboring communities or states. A recent article in The New York Times notes this notion couldn’t be further from the truth. California has been requiring sprinklers in new homes since 2011, and has not seen a negative impact on housing stock or affordability. In fact, as the story states, “there’s a robust demand for housing.” Take into consideration these figures highlighted in the story: the Sacramento region has approved more than…

Source:: NFPA – Fire Sprinkler Initiative


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