Traduction

NFPA aide Domino Rappelons clients à changer leurs piles des avertisseurs de fumée lors du changement de leurs horloges ce week-end

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By Susan McKelvey

NFPA and Domino’s have teamed up once again to help people protect themselves and their loved ones from home fires. Using daylight savings time and pizza boxes, we’re working together to encourage the public to change their batteries when they change their clocks this weekend. (Daylight savings time is Sunday, Mars 8, at 2 a.m.)

Domino’s is using its pizza boxes to deliver fire safety tips throughout the month of March in participating markets across the country.

“Daylight saving time brings a convenient, timely reminder to change the batteries in your smoke alarm, which is an easy, important step to make your home safer,” said Jenny Fouracre, Domino’s Pizza spokesperson. “Domino’s has a great opportunity to reach many people in their homes and we want to use it to share fire safety tips with them. We are excited to work with the NFPA to help make homes across the country a little bit safer.”

As part of the spring campaign, les clients qui commandent de participer magasins de Domino peuvent être surpris lorsque leur exécution arrive à bord d'un camion de pompiers. If all the smoke alarms in the home are working, the pizza is free. If a smoke alarm is not working, the firefighters will replace the batteries or leave a fully functioning smoke alarm in the home.

For more information on smoke alarm installation, testing and maintenance, visit our Smoke Alarm Central page.

Source:: NFPA – Safety Information


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