Traduction

Family has close call with carbon monoxide exposure

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By Lisa Braxton

A knock on the door by a sick child is credited with playing a big role in saving a family of five in Airdrie, Alberta. One night last week, 10-year-old Ashlea Orsted knocked on her parentsbedroom door complaining of feeling sick. A short while later, the child collapsed. This was followed by her father, Dorien, struggling to stand up, her sister collapsing on the bathroom floor and her brother complaining of a headache and being unable to walk. The family managed to get outside and call 911. They were hospitalized with extremely high levels of carbon monoxide (CO) exposure and placed on oxygen.

Airdrie Deputy Fire Chief Garth Rabel is quoted in the Airdrie City View as saying that the home had no working CO alarms and that a boiler leak filled the home with CO. After the family was released from the hospital, Dorien purchased a set of alarms.

NFPA provides material the fire service can use to remind the public of the dangers of CO poisoning and the importance of CO alarms, including the new Keeping Your Community Safe with Carbon Monoxide Alarms Toolkit. In addition safety tips on CO safety are available.

Source:: NFPA – Safety Information


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