Dispose of your Christmas tree promptly; nearly 40 percent of Christmas tree home fires occur in January

By Susan McKelvey

The gifts have been opened, the ornaments are starting to sag, and the fallen pine needles are multiplying daily – these are clear signs that it’s time to remove the Christmas tree and other holiday decorations from your home.

Christmas trees are flammable objects. The longer they’re in your home, the more they dry out, making them a significant fire hazard.

Nearly 40 pour cent des incendies de maison qui commencent par les arbres de Noël se produire en Janvier. Although these fires aren’t common, when they do occur, they’re more likely to be serious. On average, une de chaque 40 reported home structure Christmas tree fires resulted in a death, as compared to an average of one death per 142 total des incendies de la structure de la maison signalés.

While many people choose to keep their Christmas trees and holiday decorations up for a few weeks after the holidays, the continued use of seasonal lighting and dried-out trees presents increased fire risks.

For recommendations on safely disposing of your Christmas tree, along with tips for safely putting away holiday decorations, visit “Put a Freeze on Winter Fires”, NFPA’s campaign with the United States Fire Administration (USFA).

Source:: NFPA – Safety Information

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