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Are you or a loved one heading back to school? Keep fire safety and sprinklers in mind

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By Fred Durso, Jr.

More than 70 students were packed into a Kansas fraternity house this week when a fire erupted on the third-floor living area. More than 30 firefighters responded to the blaze, which was initiated by the improper disposal of smoking materials, according to a story on FireEngineering.com. All occupants escaped safely.

The structure is no stranger to fire; construction on the bulding’s interior two years earlier initiated a previous blaze. The residents escaped injury, but others who have encountered fire have not been as fortunate.

The Center for Campus Fire Safety (CCFS) notes that there have been 86 fatal fires documented in Greek housing, college campuses, and off-campus housing since 2000 that have claimed more than 120 lives. The majority of those deaths occurred in off-campus settings.

CCFS is urging students, particularly those moving out of the dorms and into a house for the first time, to exercise caution and heed the lessons of previous tragedies. Install and maintain working smoke alarms, practice escape planning, and tout the importance of fire sprinkler systems. “CCFS also wants to point out the necessity of fire sprinkler systems,” stated CCFS President Paul Martin, who also noted that eight out of 10 fire deaths occur at night while people are sleeping.

Live in or nearby a college town? Now is the ideal time to start an advocacy campaign around residential sprinklers. See if your state has a sprinkler coalition and join forces with other advocates to educate the public on these systems to get them mandated in your community. Garner community support by having residents sign a sprinkler petition. Urge student groups on campus to champion for this issue by supplying them with the plethora of advocacy materials available on the Fire Sprinkler Initiative site. Educate them and yourself on the home fire problem and life-safety aspects of sprinklers. Student activists love a good cause. Let’s give them one.

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Valiant effort by college student fails to save his friend from a house fire

Dynamic duo: Smoke alarms and residential sprinklers credited for saving a teen’s life

Source:: NFPA – Fire Sprinkler Initiative

Michael S. Williams

Michael S. Williams

Williams a fondé l'Institut de formation des services d'incendie en 1995 pour trouver des solutions aux défis auxquels est confronté le service de pompiers volontaires. Il a été un membre actif de California State Association des pompiers (CSF) depuis 1994, ayant servi aux bénévoles et comités de relations publiques, et en tant que directeur adjoint de la division sud. Il est membre de plusieurs organisations locales, y compris le comté de Santa Barbara incendie Conseil Safe, les agents de formation trois comtés Association, Santa Barbara Chapter of CAER and is a founding member of the Santa Barbara PIO group Emergency Public Information Communicators (EPIC). He has been the author of many articles and a columnist for a local newspaper on public safety matters. He is also the co-host of Community Alert on KZSB AM-1290 in Santa Barbara. Williams has been a member of the California State Board of Fire Services since 2008. Prior to becoming involved in the volunteer fire service, Williams was a California police officer for 12 ½ years and a POST certified Field Training Officer. He is a licensed private investigator and security consultant specializing in self-insured, government and insurance defense assignments.


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